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The Homestead, The north shore's gracious inn
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WELCOME TO THE HOMESTEAD
Built in 1927 in Williamsburg style, The Homestead has been under family management for more than 75 years. Since 1983 the current owners have been welcoming guests from across the globe to their 90-room inn and residence. As well as overnight guests, The Homestead welcomes individuals and families for extended stays, whether in town on business, with the University, to visit family and friends, or temporarily between homes. The Homestead's unique combination of traditional hotel rooms and extended stay apartments easily accommodates any need. The Homestead's Library (accommodating up to 18 people) is available to guests for special functions at a nominal charge.

Miles of walking and cycling paths through Evanston's lakefront parks provide guests with a host of opportunities for fresh air and exercise. Homestead guests also receive special rates at a nearby health club.

About Evanston

Located on Chicago's North Shore, the graceful suburb of Evanston is a vibrant city in its own right. Covering 8.5 square miles, Evanston has a population of 74,000, of which 10,000 are students at Northwestern University.

Architectural richness, sophisticated dining, shopping and entertainment, a wealth of intellectual and cultural events, and a beautiful shoreline give this community enduring appeal.

Evanston boasts three distinct historic districts, fine specialty shops, noted art galleries, and exceptional bookstores. It offers six museums, several excellent theaters, a nationally recognized dance company, and its own symphony orchestra. Northwestern University contributes a superb variety of music, theater, dance, and athletic events.

For more about this alluring Chicago suburb, visit Chicago's North Shore Convention & Visitors Bureau Web site at www.visitchicagonorthshore.com

A Little Bit of History

Architect Philip A. Danielson began drawing up plans for The Homestead in late 1926 when he married Ruby Larson. On their honeymoon, the couple conceived the idea of designing and building a distinctive 18th century family hotel in east Evanston. Their goal was to offer fine accommodations "for a night or a year in a family setting and a wonderful location". They planned to manage it together until it was running smoothly, then return Philip to his architectural practice.

Construction began in early 1927. Philip derived architectural inspiration from Colonial designs of the American South. Ruby used her background in art and interior design and her substantial knowledge of antiques to decorate the hotel's lobby, salon, and dining room. With great fanfare, the doors opened to the public on February 11, 1928.

Business was good for the Danielsons that first year. Then, in 1929, the stock market crashed, bringing on the American Depression. Though well respected, the inn carried debt from being built when land and materials were at a premium. The Danielsons worked hard to keep The Homestead from falling into the hands of creditors, and their efforts succeeded. As the Depression gave way to a wartime economy, business improved and The Homestead again became a profitable venture. The Danielsons continued to operate The Homestead until 1957 and imbued it with the graciousness it has today.

Since it opened in 1928, private owners have continued to offer fine accommodations "for a night or a year in a family setting and a wonderful location," as the Danielsons conceived. The Homestead today retains its original design. Guests enjoy the same lovely detail, graceful moldings, and handsome fixtures which enhanced their comfort 75 years ago.



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847-475-3300, 1625 Hinman Avenue, Evanston, IL 60201
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